All posts by Elizabeth Mestnik

Announcing: Introduction to The Williamson Technique


 
Introduction to The Williamson Technique (Level 1); A movement workshop for actors with Caitlin Rigney

THIS IS A NECESSARY PART OF YOUR WORK.

The BENEFITS for your ACTING and LIFE are tremendous.

Work to get rid of TENSION, get to know and live in your BODY. Make friends with it and don’t let it limit your experience or acting. Your relationship to that work and your body is ONGOING, so even for those who have done movement in the past, we strongly recommend continuing that exploration with Caitlin and this work. 

It is imperative that you work on all areas of your instrument, including your vital voice and body. Many of you may have worked in other techniques with specific focuses on voice and/or body. This technique was specifically designed for the actor, to integrate the philosophies and techniques of Meisner training to the body and voice. Making yourself open, present, and available to what is going on around you – and translating that into instinctive behavior.

When:

Starts Monday June 24th for 6 weeks

Mondays — 2pm to 4:30pm

Enrollment Fee: $280

Where: 

EMAS
11423 Moorpark St
North Hollywood, CA 91602

Register: www.emasla.com/registration

 

Animal Work Acting Workshop

EMAS Black Text Logo

Presents:

Animal Work Acting Workshop

Exploring your character through Animal Work. 

 

Over the course of this three day acting workshop, Caitlin will be taking you through movement/body exercises that will help you to build a deeper physical characterization of any role. This is a fantastic way to create non-cliché, unpredictable, instinctive character choices. It will deepen the understanding of the character as well as allow for you to have an open instrument through which behavior can be revealed. You will discover how it is that your animal moves through space, how it accesses sound, and truly identify their five senses.

Both the scene and the animal you would like to work with is your choice (best if it is something you have worked on in the past).  Caitlin will ask you to really sit with the character and daydream on what type of animal you trust your character is. And to then email her letting her know the scene in which you are working on, your character and the animal you will be exploring in the workshop.  Your animal may even change after the first class and that is absolutely okay. 

Class size is limited to 14 students to maintain one-on-one instruction.

When:

Friday June 14th.   @7-9pm

Saturday June 15th and Sunday June 16th @10 am- noon

Location: 

Elizabeth Mestnik’s Acting Studio @ 11423 Moorpark Street

Instructor: Caitlin Rigney

Fee: $110

Register at www.emasla.com/registration

Announcing: Level 2 On Camera Technique Class

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Presenting:

On Camera Technique Class – Level 2

July 10 – August 21, 2019

Available to all who have graduated from EMAS Professional Meisner Program and those who have taken On-Camera Technique 1

For the actor committed to successful film and television auditioning.

There are no scene partners, there are no excuses – this work is all you – on camera.

In Level 2 On Camera Technique, we delve more deeply into:

  • Scene structure and how to tell the story and find an effective “button” to the scene.
  • Creating an opening moment
  • The importance of your eyes and eyeline and how to use them  
  • Understanding the playing space and stillness and how it improves your game
  • Taking control of the audition room
  • How to handle physicality like a fight, eating, or a kiss in an audition
  • How to handle the callback

With the majority of all auditions for television and film requiring that the actor be put on camera for the casting director and/or producers to review, today’s working actor must possess a solid camera technique that is specific to the audition format. In this course strong cold-read and on-camera skills are developed as well as an empowered perspective of the casting process and a clear understanding of what it truly means to “own” the room.

WHEN: 7 Wednesdays @ 7:00pm

LOCATION: EMAS 11423 Moorpark Street, Studio City

TUITION: $380 ($200 deposit required to hold spot)

REGISTRATION: https://www.emasla.com/registration/

QUESTIONS: 323-528-6280

INSTRUCTOR: Thom Rivera

Best Movie Performances of 2017 (According to Me)

Guest Post by EMAS Community Member, Joanna Enright

2017 is coming to a rousing conclusion as far as great film performances go. The year got off to a slow start, but it is building up great momentum as the big films of the year come through in time for the end of the year holiday season. This year, the competition for awards will be fierce, especially in the Best Actor category, as we’re seeing some major (and new) stars taking on highly challenging roles and bringing them in with everything they’ve got.

I’ve singled out a few of my favorite performances from 2017 (so far) to highlight here. The actors in these roles are all, in varied ways, with different approaches and styles, working at the top of their game, with passion for what they do and calling on their highest intelligence and craftsmanship. All of this is why each of these actors can offer a lot to those who love and are inspired by the art of acting.

 

Dustin Hoffman, The Meyerowitz Stories

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Academy Award-winner Dustin Hoffman (Tootsie, The Graduate, Midnight Cowboy) is back in top form in Noah Baumbach’s ensemble comedy about a family that comes back together after years of dysfunction to celebrate their artist father’s career retrospective. Working with a script (by Baumbach) that is both hilarious, trenchant and at times painfully heartbreaking, Hoffman offers a singular character performance as the ego-driven yet utterly emotionally unaware patriarch of the Meyerowtiz clan. The tiny details in Hoffman’s performance, as he glides through fractured interchanges with his sons, wives, and (secretly envied) artist friends are hilarious. Hoffman wonderfully captures the quiet egomania of a New York artist who keeps propping himself up in the face of his failure as an artist and a father, and yet keeps on going. This highly watchable film also features uniformly great performances by the ensemble cast, including Ben Stiller and Adam Sandler as Hoffman’s estranged sons, who are unable to stop competing for their dad’s attention, even in middle-age.

 

Gary Oldman, The Darkest Hour

Gary Oldman as Winston Churchill

Gary Oldman (Sid and Nancy, Immortal Beloved, The Dark Knight) delivers a towering performance as Prime Minister Winston Churchill in director Joe Wright’s The Darkest Hour. The film is the riveting story of Churchill’s leadership in the stark early years of the Second World War, as France was being overtaken by German forces and England was beginning to realize the enormity of the threat they were facing. Oldman’s character work in this film is indelible, as he captures Churchill’s persona as a brilliant yet eccentric leader who was tasked with leading the English public (and parliament) towards support for entering into war with Germany.

Oldman, wearing heavy prosthetic makeup and extra weight, comes through with incredible emotional force as Churchill, from the high moments of his great speeches to the English people, and also in the small moments when he faces his fears over England’s possible fate. This stirring performance by one of the best actors of our time is a must-see for any actor working today.

 

Mark Rylance, Dunkirk

mark Rylance in DunkirkMark Rylance is one of the most arresting and skilled actors working today, and this Academy Award Winner (Best Supporting Actor-Bridge of Spies) brings an emotional center to the searing story of Dunkirk. Christopher Nolan’s rendition of this key battle during the early days of World War II (in events also covered in “The Darkest Hour”) is a fast-paced epic that offers few breaks from the unrelenting tension of the story. As the film cuts between scenes of the war’s horrors on land, sea, and in the air, Rylance brings a feeling of emotional stability to the story. As an Englishman who sails a small yacht to the village of Dunkirk to help with the rescue of British troops, Rylance, with minimal dialogue, offers an emotional gravity and sensitivity in his scenes that is brilliant and heartbreaking. This is another must-see performance in a year of great ones.


Timothee Chalamet, Call Me By Your Name

Call Me by My Name Chalamet

Timothee Chalamet delivers a breakout performance in the sensitive and ultimately heartbreaking love story, Call Me By Your Name. As the teenage Eliot, a student and musician in 1981 Italy, Chalamet captures the painful longing of first love, as he and the graduate student living with his family (Armie Hammer) fall into a forbidden love affair they know must ultimately come to an end. Hammer and Chalet are gorgeous together, and their tasteful love scenes together are beautifully rendered.

There’s no doubt this year will be remembered for a host of great films marked by amazing writing and cinematography, but more than anything, it’s the performances by some of the best actors working today in these films that will leave a lasting impression on me.

– Joanna Enright